From the Earth to the Moon

A Thornton Vermont Story

Book Cover: From the Earth to the Moon
Part of the Thornton Vermont series:

Thornton, Vermont, 1953:

After six years in the Navy, the last three spent engaged in the Korean War, George Cartwright is coming home. No longer craving adventure, George wants nothing more than to start building a quiet life. When a beautiful, unexpected stranger meets his train, George understands why it's called love at first sight. Ginny Fletcher is everything George never knew he wanted in a woman, but his love forces him to question the meaning of brotherhood, family, and the weight of promises.

Reviews:Angela Amman on Amazon wrote:

Garriepy does a wonderful job of transporting her readers back to 1953, when family expectations weighed heavily on family dinners and the promises between young men and women were made with heartfelt conversations and small touches. Her characters are captivating, and the story she builds around two brothers and the woman who may come between them is developed with perfect pacing.


From the Earth to the Moon is a work of short romantic fiction.

Precipice: Volume Three

The Literary Anthology of Write on Edge

Book Cover: Precipice: Volume Three
Part of the Precipice series:

The third annual publication of Precipice: The Literary Anthology of Write on Edge explores the concept of boundaries in short stories, poetry, and memoir by a selection of authors from the Write on Edge community.

Published:
Publisher: Bannerwing Books
Genres:
Tags:

Precipice: Volume Two

The Literary Anthology of Write on Edge

Book Cover: Precipice: Volume Two
Part of the Precipice series:

"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from."
- Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men

In the second volume of Precipice, twenty-four authors from the Write on Edge community explore the concept of luck in twenty-six works of poetry, short fiction, and memoir.

Published:
Publisher: Bannerwing Books
Genres:
Tags:

Write on Edge: where inspiration meets community.

Write on Edge (formerly The Red Dress Club) was created as a place for writers to gather, exchange ideas and learn something about the art of storytelling. We welcome any and all writers, regardless of level – anyone interested in writing has a place here.

We are also open to writers of all genres: Fiction or non-fiction. Fantasy, young adult, chick lit, memoir – there are no limits. You don’t have to join to participate in the club.

We have two weekly prompts. Tuesday we have a fiction/non-fiction prompt, called Red Writing Hood. You write your piece on your personal blog and link up on our site Friday. Our memoir prompt, RemembeRED, comes out Friday, and you link up on our site Tuesday. Feel free to comment on any of our other posts on the site.

We bring you guest posts from published authors and others in the writing industry, a weekly featured blogger and posts from The Red Dress Club hosts on writing. Even though we have changed our name, we still are inspired by a blog post by Jenny of The Bloggess about a red dress – thus the name of this blog. Jenny wrote: “I want, just once, to wear a bright red, strapless ball gown with no apologies. I want to be shocking, and vivid and wear a dress as intensely amazing as the person I so want to be. And the more I thought about it the more I realized how often we deny ourselves that red dress and all the other capricious, ridiculous, overindulgent and silly things that we desperately want but never let ourselves have because they are simply “not sensible”. Things like flying lessons, and ballet shoes, and breaking into spontaneous song, and building a train set, and crawling onto the roof just to see the stars better. Things like cartwheels and learning how to box and painting encouraging words on your body to remind yourself that you’re worth it.”

For many of us, our Red Dress is our dream to become a published writer. Maybe we just need a little extra motivation. Maybe we just have to try to Write on Edge.

Precipice: Volume One

The Literary Anthology of Write on Edge

Book Cover: Precipice: Volume One
Part of the Precipice series:

The first volume of Precipice features twenty-one short stories and essays from seventeen members of the Write on Edge community.

Published:
Publisher: Bannerwing Books
Genres:
Tags:

Write on Edge: where inspiration meets community.

Write on Edge (formerly The Red Dress Club) was created as a place for writers to gather, exchange ideas and learn something about the art of storytelling. We welcome any and all writers, regardless of level – anyone interested in writing has a place here. We are also open to writers of all genres: Fiction or non-fiction. Fantasy, young adult, chick lit, memoir – there are no limits. You don’t have to join to participate in the club. We have two weekly prompts. Tuesday we have a fiction/non-fiction prompt, called Red Writing Hood. You write your piece on your personal blog and link up on our site Friday. Our memoir prompt, RemembeRED, comes out Friday, and you link up on our site Tuesday. Feel free to comment on any of our other posts on the site. We bring you guest posts from published authors and others in the writing industry, a weekly featured blogger and posts from The Red Dress Club hosts on writing. Even though we have changed our name, we still are inspired by a blog post by Jenny of The Bloggess about a red dress – thus the name of this blog. Jenny wrote: “I want, just once, to wear a bright red, strapless ball gown with no apologies. I want to be shocking, and vivid and wear a dress as intensely amazing as the person I so want to be. And the more I thought about it the more I realized how often we deny ourselves that red dress and all the other capricious, ridiculous, overindulgent and silly things that we desperately want but never let ourselves have because they are simply “not sensible”. Things like flying lessons, and ballet shoes, and breaking into spontaneous song, and building a train set, and crawling onto the roof just to see the stars better. Things like cartwheels and learning how to box and painting encouraging words on your body to remind yourself that you’re worth it.” For many of us, our Red Dress is our dream to become a published writer. Maybe we just need a little extra motivation. Maybe we just have to try to Write on Edge.

Echoes In Darkness

Book Cover: Echoes In Darkness
Part of the Bannerwing Collections series:

“Ain’t nothing in the dark that ain’t there in the light…”

Stories of darkness and light — physical… otherworldly… and in the human spirit. From dangerous to romantic to chilling, this collection showcases seven absorbing tales and an unforgettable cast of characters.

In Kate Shrewsday’s “To Hear the Dead Proclaim,” a trans-Atlantic air traveler comforts her seat mate with a sympathetic ear. His story allows her into the mind of a genius, but some conversations are best left unspoken.

In “Flutters,” Angela Amman takes us into the steamy Savannah heat, where the last surviving daughter in a family of women with extraordinary powers struggles to maintain her mother’s legacy at all costs.

Helen has lived her life obsessed with a statue, going so far as to travel the world for a glimpse of it in person. The consequences of her trip reveal an ancient curse and leave Helen’s life forever changed in Mandy Dawson’s “Awakening.”

Previously published as a stand-alone short, Cameron D. Garriepy’s “Requiring of Care” follows Lucy Montgomery to an unusual job interview. The would-be nanny is pulled into the world of Violet, a little girl who holds fragments of a haunting story.

“Bad Deal,” an excerpt from Andra Watkins’ debut novel To Live Forever: An Afterlife Journey of Meriwether Lewis (Word Hermit Press, 2014), introduces us to an unusual little girl named Emmaline Cagney. Emmaline longs to fly from the dark side of her mother’s affections, but what strangers lurk in the shadows?

From Kameko Murakami: A terrible accident robbed Danaë of her life, but not by killing her. Instead she is cursed, invisible to the world, with one exception: the dying. When her path crosses that of the one living man who knows she’s there, Danaë must decide if she is to remain “Unseen.” [Previously published.]

“Ain’t nothing in the dark that ain’t there in the light, Edie.” Nyctophobic Eden Summerhill has nowhere to go but the lonely family farmhouse she’s inherited, but the darkness is waiting there for her in “Love Apples” by Elizabeth Yon.

Reviews:Michael Carnell on Amazon wrote:

The seven stories here range from the psychological thriller to parental betrayal to the more standard ghost story, but they will all creep into the corners of your mind and take up residence there.


Metaphysical Gravity

Four Stories About Love

Book Cover: Metaphysical Gravity
Part of the Bannerwing Collections series:

"Love is metaphysical gravity." R. Buckminster Fuller

A force beyond reason and the laws of nature, love draws us together in many ways. In these four short stories, four authors explore the essence of love, from practical to magical.

"In Her Hands," by Angela Amman, explores the moment in which a woman weighs the choice between expectations and the lasting passion she craves.

A shy librarian offers her beautiful best friend a shot at the English teacher she secretly desires, in Mandy Dawson's "Home." But what if beauty isn't all he needs in a lover?

Cameron D. Garriepy's eponymous "Valentine" is a young woman whose fairytale is sidetracked by a trickster loose in the streets of New Orleans.

In "Elephants in the Atmosphere" by Kameko Murakami, a young woman in extraordinary circumstances finds love in an unexpected place and against all odds. Is a happy ending even possible?

Reviews:Andra Watkins on Amazon wrote:

Metaphysical Gravity is a shimmering jewel of a book.


Nothing Goes Away

Book Cover: Nothing Goes Away

“Nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know.” ~ Pema Chodron

Angela Amman's debut collection of short fiction delves into the private shadows of three very distinct relationships. For these three women, there are lessons to embrace before they can release the turmoil which holds them back from hope.

"Cicada Song" tells the story of a mother's struggle with her daughter's attitude toward food, revealing her own fears and misgivings.

In "Splinters," a young woman on the brink of first love copes with secret pain she thought long buried and banished.

"Scents of Iron and Pine" explores the depth of subtle cruelty and self-delusion a wife is willing to endure to hold her family together.

Reviews:Lisa A. Kramer on Amazon wrote:

Angela Amman's writing is lyrical, powerful, and truly wonderful. I love how much psychology and intense emotion--sometimes disturbing emotion--she packs into a short tale.